Animation 1/14-1/18

Introduction to Animation

Chapter 8

The best way to learn about animation is to start animating, so you’ll begin this chapter with the classic exercise of bouncing a ball.  You’ll then take a closer look at the animation tools the Autodesk May software provides and how they work for your scene.  You’ll do that by throwing an axe.  Finally, you’ll tackle animating a more complex system of parts when you bring a locomotive to life.

SWBAT:

  • Set keyframes to establish the movement scheme for an object
  • Import objects into a scene
  • Create the feeling of weight and mass for an animated object using scale animation
  • Read animation curves in the Graph Editor
  • Differentiate among different animation principles such as squash, stretch, anticipation, and follow-through
  • Set up a hierarchy for better animation control
  • Transfer animation between objects
  • Create text
  • Create motion trails and animate objects along a path
  • Set up models for animaiton
  • Use selection handles to speed up workflow
  • Animate objects in time with each other

Projects

  1. Cartoon Ball
  2. Throwing and Axe
  3. Flying Text
  4. Animating the Catapult

Audio Video Production 1/14-1/18

2 Minute Highlight Video

Make a 2 minute highlight video of a  subject of your choice.  Examples include:

  • Sports highlights
  • Video Game highlights
  • Hobbies
  • Things you like
  • Etc…

Get video footage  from youtube, your phone, or off of a video camera that you have or used from the school.

Must add music and/or voice over audio

Use transitions between clips

Add a title and end credits.

Use the Adobe Premiere Pro software that we have already leaned to use to edit your video.  Make sure to watch your timing and keep the content relevant.

Video Game Design 1/14-1/18


Here we introduce a way the students can get input from the mouse using mouse clicked. We keep some of the same building blocks by showing examples with circles and ghosts, and then the student programs prompt them to use this new idea in combination with tracking overall program state.

Objective

Students will be able to…

  • Describe how events are different than timers
  • Use mouse click events to create programs that respond to user clicks

Prior Knowledge

Functions, parameters
Variables and scope
Drawing graphics objects, including setting the position and color of an object

Discussion Questions

  • What is an event?
  • What types of events are used in programs?

Mouse events capture actions performed by the mouse. This allows you to create interactive programs including basic games. This lesson explains how to use mouse events to make some interactive animations.

Objective

Students will be able to…

  • Explain how events are different from timers.
  • Create interactive programs that use events to respond to the mouse moving.

Prior Knowledge

Functions, parameters, and return values
Mouse clicked events lesson
Callback functions

Discussion Questions

What types of events are used in programs?
What is an event?


In this lesson we continue to use user input via the mouse.

Objective

Students will be able to…

  • Explain how events are different from timers.
  • Create interactive programs that use events to respond to the mouse moving.

Prior Knowledge

Mouse input
Drawing basic graphics objects
Mouse clicked and mouse moved events
Callback functions

Discussion Questions

What is an event?
What types of events are used in programs?


Keyboard events capture when the user presses keys on the keyboard. This allows you to write programs that take input from the keyboard to change what is happening in the program.

Objective

Students will be able to…

  • Explain how events are different from timers.
  • Create interactive programs that use events to respond to the keyboard input.

Prior Knowledge

Functions, parameters, and return values
Callback functions
Mouse events lessons

Discussion Questions

What is an event?
How are key events triggered?
How are mouse events triggered?
How can we get more information about the exact thing that triggered the event? For example, how can we determine what key was pressed?

Lesson: 4.9 Unit Quiz

Section:

Activities

These are all the activities included in the lesson.

Activity Due Date

4.9.1 Animation and Games Unit Quiz

PRINT QUIZPRO

4.9.2 Animation Exercises Badge

Computer Science 1/14-1/18

Click on the following link for a quick survey.

https://goo.gl/forms/Yix0XMsXlzQKVSbU2

 

Lesson: 7.1 Timers

Section:


In this lesson students will be introduced to the concept of using timers for animation. Now instead of having graphics programs that stay the same, the content changes every time the timer runs. The first program students will see is a moving ball, so discussing this with the class as a demo on the projector is very useful.

Objective

Students will be able to…

  • Explain in their own words how animation works
  • Create animation in programs using the setTimer function
  • Explain what a callback function is

Prior Knowledge

  • Graphics from Basic Javascript and Graphics
  • Functions with parameters
  • Cartesian coordinates. Locating points in an (x, y) plane.
  • The start function

Discussion Questions

  • What is animation?
  • What is a timer and how are timers used in a program?
  • What is the difference between a timer and a loop?
  • What is a callback function?
  • How would you set a timer to call a function named drawCircle once every 50 milliseconds?

In this lesson we’ll look at more examples with timers and start making more interesting animations. Students will use timers and the Randomizer to create animations on the canvas.

Objective

Students will be able to…

  • Create programs with timers to create increasingly challenging animations
  • Analyze existing programs and explain how they create animations
  • Utilize the Randomizer to generate random events in their animations

Prior Knowledge

  • Timers lesson
  • Basic JavaScript graphics and the canvas
  • Functions and parameters

Discussion Questions

  • What is the difference between a timer and a loop?
  • What are the bounds of the graphics canvas? In other words, what are the (x, y) coordinates of each corner of the canvas?
  • What is the farthest left coordinates (smallest x coordinate) you could put a circle with radius r and still be able to see the full circle?
  • What is the farthest right coordinates (highest x coordinate) you could put a circle with radius r and still be able to see the full circle?
  • What is the farthest up coordinates (lowest y coordinate) you could put a circle with radius r and still be able to see the full circle?
  • What is the farthest down coordinates (highest y coordinate) you could put a circle with radius r and still be able to see the full circle?
  • Describe how you would create a circle with random size, color, and location on the canvas.

In this lesson students now use timers in combination with the other ideas they have learned, including more graphics as well as coordinate math to create different objects. The random ghosts serves as a fun example to show how you can modify things once you have the basic building blocks in place.

Objective

Students will be able to…

  • Explain the general workflow of creating an animation program
  • Analyze animation programs and identify similarities and differences
  • Create increasingly challenging animations using timers, graphics, and the Randomizer

Prior Knowledge

  • Variables and scoping
  • Basics of timers
  • Functions with parameters
  • Drawing basic graphics objects
  • Using the Randomizer functions
  • Understanding of using sine and cosine is helpful, but not necessary to complete the exercises

Discussion Questions

  • What is animation?
  • What are three things that we need in all of our animation programs?
  • If you are writing a program that draws several different things to the canvas, why is it useful to have separate functions that draw each of these things?
  • How are functions and parameters useful when making animation programs?
  • How is the Randomizer useful when making animation programs?

This lesson builds on our use of timers and utilizes if statements inside timers to dynamically change what the animations are doing. The exercises build on the Bouncing Ball example.

Objective

Students will be able to create increasingly challenging animations that simulate movement using timers

Prior Knowledge

  • Timers
  • Graphics

Discussion Questions

  • What are if/else statements?
  • How do you think we could use if/else statements inside timers?
  • Why would this be helpful?

Here we introduce a way the students can get input from the mouse using mouse clicked. We keep some of the same building blocks by showing examples with circles and ghosts, and then the student programs prompt them to use this new idea in combination with tracking overall program state.

Objective

Students will be able to…

  • Describe how events are different than timers
  • Use mouse click events to create programs that respond to user clicks

Prior Knowledge

  • Functions, parameters
  • Variables and scope
  • Drawing graphics objects, including setting the position and color of an object

Discussion Questions

  • What is an event?
  • What types of events are used in programs?

Animation 1/7 – 1/11

Chapter 7

Shading and Texturing

Shading is the term for applying colors and textures to create materials, also known in Autodesk Maya software as shaders.  A shader defines an object’s look–its’ color, tactile texture, transparency, luminescence, glow and so forth.

SWBAT

  • Differentiate between different shader types
  • Create and edit shader networks in the Hypershade window
  • Apply shaders and textures placement
  • Set up UVs on a model for the best texture placement
  • Understand the steps to set up texture images to fit a model’s UV layout
  • Tweak UVs to align texture details
  • Use Maya’s toon shading to create a cartoon look.

Project(s)

  • Shading and Texturing the Toy Plane
  • Nurbs sphere and Nurbs cone
  • Import and image file as texture
  • Use Photoshop Files
  • Textures and UVs for a Red Wagon
  • Setting up UVs on the decorative box

Audio Video Production 1/7 – 1/11

Learning Audio/Video Production

Chapter 1

Message and Medium

This chapter provides basic information equipment and storytelling, then progresses into more detail about the types of professionals who work in the industry.  It also covers the production workflow, and how to set up and use the most common camera shots for maximum effort.

  • What is Video Production?
  • Equipment and Gear Basics
  • Telling a story
  • Tools of the Content Creator: Symbols, Clues, and Twists
  • Careers in A/V Production
  • Production Workflow
  • The Shot: Composing for Meaning
  • Shooting to Edit
  • Post production: Putting it All Together
  • End-of-Chapter Review and Activities

Message and Medium.  These two concepts are the essence of the audio/video production process.  The message is the story you want to tell.  The medium is the format you use to tell that story.

This chapter focuses on the basic information you’ll need to get started on your first video production.  You will learn about equipment and gear, the components of storytelling, and the people who work together to create all kinds of visual content, including movies, television shows, training videos, and animations.  You will be introduced to the production workflow and all the different shots you can use to capture the video you need to tell your story.

Project:

Ten-Shot Self Portrait (p.53 of Textbook)

 

 

Video Game Design 1/7 – 1/11


In this lesson students will be introduced to the concept of using timers for animation. Now instead of having graphics programs that stay the same, the content changes every time the timer runs. The first program students will see is a moving ball, so discussing this with the class as a demo on the projector is very useful.

Objective

Students will be able to…

  • Explain in their own words how animation works
  • Create animation in programs using the setTimer function
  • Explain what a callback function is

Prior Knowledge

Graphics from Basic Javascript and Graphics
Functions with parameters
Cartesian coordinates. Locating points in an (x, y) plane.
The start function

Discussion Questions

  • What is animation?
  • What is a timer and how are timers used in a program?
  • What is the difference between a timer and a loop?
  • What is a callback function?
  • How would you set a timer to call a function named drawCircle once every 50 milliseconds?

In this lesson we’ll look at more examples with timers and start making more interesting animations. Students will use timers and the Randomizer to create animations on the canvas.

Objective

Students will be able to…

  • Create programs with timers to create increasingly challenging animations
  • Analyze existing programs and explain how they create animations
  • Utilize the Randomizer to generate random events in their animations

Prior Knowledge

Timers lesson
Basic JavaScript graphics and the canvas
Functions and parameters

Discussion Questions

  • What is the difference between a timer and a loop?
  • What are the bounds of the graphics canvas? In other words, what are the (x, y) coordinates of each corner of the canvas?
  • What is the farthest left coordinates (smallest x coordinate) you could put a circle with radius r and still be able to see the circle?
  • What is the farthest right coordinates (highest x coordinate) you could put a circle with radius r and still be able to see the circle?
  • What is the farthest up coordinates (lowest y coordinate) you could put a circle with radius r and still be able to see the circle?
  • What is the farthest down coordinates (highest y coordinate) you could put a circle with radius r and still be able to see the circle?
  • Describe how you would create a circle with random size, color, and location on the canvas.

In this lesson students now use timers in combination with the other ideas they have learned, including more graphics as well as coordinate math to create different objects. The random ghosts serves as a fun example to show how you can modify things once you have the basic building blocks in place.

Objective

Students will be able to…

  • Explain the general workflow of creating an animation program
  • Analyze animation programs and identify similarities and differences
  • Create increasingly challenging animations using timers, graphics, and the Randomizer

Prior Knowledge

Variables and scoping
Basics of timers
Functions with parameters
Drawing basic graphics objects
Using the Randomizer functions
Understanding of using sine and cosine is helpful, but not necessary to complete the exercises

Discussion Questions

  • What is animation?
  • What are three things that we need in all of our animation programs?
  • If you are writing a program that draws several different things to the canvas, why is it useful to have separate functions that draw each of these things?
  • How are functions and parameters useful when making animation programs?
  • How is the Randomizer useful when making animation programs?

This lesson builds on our use of timers and utilizes if statements inside timers to dynamically change what the animations are doing. The exercises build on the Bouncing Ball example.

Objective

Students will be able to…

  • Explain the general workflow of creating an animation program
  • Analyze animation programs and identify similarities and differences
  • Create increasingly challenging animations using timers, graphics, and the Randomizer

Prior Knowledge

Timers, Graphics

Discussion Questions

  • What is animation?
  • What are three things that we need in all of our animation programs?
  • If you are writing a program that draws several different things to the canvas, why is it useful to have separate functions that draw each of these things?
  • How are functions and parameters useful when making animation programs?
  • How is the Randomizer useful when making animation programs?

Here we introduce a way the students can get input from the mouse using mouse clicked. We keep some of the same building blocks by showing examples with circles and ghosts, and then the student programs prompt them to use this new idea in combination with tracking overall program state.

Objective

Students will be able to…

  • Describe how events are different than timers
  • Use mouse click events to create programs that respond to user clicks

Prior Knowledge

Functions, parameters
Variables and scope
Drawing graphics objects, including setting the position and color of an object

Discussion Questions

  • What is an event?
  • What types of events are used in programs?

Computer Science 1/7 – 1/11

Lesson: 6.1 Unit Test

Use your knowledge of basic Javascript to create some fun programs! Students will create their own Ghost drawings from Pac-Man, a Guessing Game, and a drawing of their own choosing. This will allow students to get creative with their code to show what they have learned.

Objective

Students will be able to…

  • Synthesize the skills and concepts from the JavaScript and Graphics, JavaScript Control Structures, and the Functions and Parameters units to solve increasingly difficult programming challenges
  • Break down a large problem into smaller parts using Top Down Design, and solve each of these smaller parts using functions
  • Create helpful comments with preconditions and postconditions to help the reader understand the code
  • Find and fix bugs in large programs

Prior Knowledge

Complete all activities in the JavaScript and Graphics, JavaScript Control Structures, and Functions and Parameters units.

Discussion Questions

  • What is programming style?
  • What is top down design?
  • What is a loop-and-a-half? What are some benefits of using a loop-and-a-half?
  • How do we decide if we should use a while loop or a for loop?

 

Animation 12/10-12/14

Chapter 7

Shading and Texturing

Shading is the term for applying colors and textures to create materials, also known in Autodesk Maya software as shaders.  A shader defines an object’s look–its’ color, tactile texture, transparency, luminescence, glow and so forth.

SWBAT

  • Differentiate between different shader types
  • Create and edit shader networks in the Hypershade window
  • Apply shaders and textures placement
  • Set up UVs on a model for the best texture placement
  • Understand the steps to set up texture images to fit a model’s UV layout
  • Tweak UVs to align texture details
  • Use Maya’s toon shading to create a cartoon look.

Project(s)

  • Shading and Texturing the Toy Plane
  • Nurbs sphere and Nurbs cone
  • Import and image file as texture
  • Use Photoshop Files
  • Textures and UVs for a Red Wagon
  • Settin up UVs on the decorative box

Audio Video Production 12/10-12/14

Lesson 18

Exporting Frames, Clips and Sequences

SWBAT

  • Choose the right export options
  • Export single frames
  • Create movie, image sequence, and audio files
  • Use Adobe Media Encoder
  • Upload to social media
  • Work with edit decision lists

In this lesson, students will learn how to choose the right export options.  This will include exporting single frames as still images as well as creating video, image sequence and audio files.

Students will find this lesson extremely helpful because they will need to share their work eventually.  Premiere Pro offers a wide range of export options.  These options can be anything from recording your projects to tape, converting them to additional digital files to posting them on social media.

-Final product is due 12/17-2018