Animation 4/23-4/26

Chapter 10

Autodesk® Maya® Lighting

Light shapes the world by showing us what we see. It creates a sense of depth, it initiates the perception of color, and it allows us to distinguish shape and form. For a scene to be successful in computer graphics (CG), these realities of light need to be reproduced as faithfully as possible. The trick is learning to see light and its astonishing effects on the world around us.

Learning Outcomes: In this chapter, you will be able to

  • ■■  Understand basic concepts for setting up CG lighting
  • ■■  Choose the appropriate Autodesk® Maya® light for a scene based on light attributes
  • ■■  Control which lights illuminate certain objects through light linking
  • ■■  Create mood and realism with raytraced shadows
  • ■■  Illuminate and render a scene with mental ray® Physical Sun and Sky
  • ■■  Produce special lighting effects with volumetric lighting, lens flare, and shader glow
  • ■■  Practice setting up a basic lighting solution for the toy airplane, glass candle holder, and decorative box
  • ■■  Use raytracing to cast shadows in your scene and use refractions to create a glass look
  • ■■  Animate the attributes of a light and aim lights with the special manipulator

Audio Video Production 4/23-4/26

Lesson 11: Editing Clips

Although the Multitrack Editor doesn’t have the same kind of deep editing as the Waveform Editor, different editing techniques are required for multitrack produc- tions. This lesson concentrates on the many ways to work with clips, including exporting collections of clips.

Goals for this lesson

In this lesson, students will learn how to do the following:

  • Use crossfading—both symmetrical and asymmetrical—to create remixes from individual clips
  • Export the mix as a single file
  • Merge multiple clips into a single clip that represents a single file
  • Pan individual clips on a per-clip basis
  • Edit a clip to fit a specific length of time (e.g., for a commercial)
  • Apply global clip stretching to fine-tune a piece of music’s specific length
  • Change volume on a per-clip basis
  • Add effects to individual clips
  • Extend a clip via looping

Video Game Design 4/23-4/26


9.1.1: Draw the Tic Tac Toe Lines

In this project, we will be writing the game of tic tac toe as shown here. The first part is to draw the board.

Start by drawing the four lines that divide the grid into 9 squares.

9.1.2: Tic Tac Toe: Responding to Mouse Events and Using a Grid

We are writing the game of tic tac toe as shown here. In this part we will handle mouse clicks and draw the Xs and Os, and also use the grid data structure to keep track of the game.

9.1.3: Tic Tac Toe: The Full Game

Write the game of tic tac toe as shown here.

In this part we will complete the game of tic tac toe by determining the winner, and drawing a line to show who won.

 

Computer Science 4/23-4/26


In this lesson, students will revisit the concept of boolean values. Booleans refer to a value that is either true or false. Named after English-born mathematician, philosopher and logician, George Boole, Booleans are used to test whether a condition is true or false.

Objective

Students will be able to:

  • Create boolean variables to represent meaningful yes/no values
  • Print out the value of a boolean variable

In this lesson, students will review how to use If and if/else statements. These statements allow programmers to use conditions to determine how their code should run.

Objective

Students will be able to:

  • Use if statements for control flow in their programs

In this lesson, students will dive into comparison operators. Comparison operators let us compare two values. Using comparison operators in programming is similar to math in that less than <, greater than >, less than or equal to <=, and greater than or equal to >= are the same. The differences are that operators for equal to are == and not equal are !=. Using comparison operators allows our program to make decisions.

Objective

Students will be able to:

  • Explain the meaning of each of the comparison operators (<, <=, >, >=, ==, !=)
  • Create programs using the comparison operators to compare values
  • Predict the boolean result of comparing two values
  • Print out the boolean result of comparing values

In this lesson, students will look at logical operators. Logical operators allow us to connect or modify Boolean expressions. Three logical operators are not ( ! ), or and and. These logical operators can be used in combination. With these logical operators, we can construct logical statements such as “I go to sleep when I am tired OR it’s after 9pm”, “I wear flip flops when I am outside AND it is NOT raining”

Objective

Students will be able to:

  • Describe the meaning and usage of each logical operator: or, and, and NOT (!)
  • Construct logical statements using boolean variables and logical operators

Animation 4/15-4/18

Chapter 10

Autodesk® Maya® Lighting

Light shapes the world by showing us what we see. It creates a sense of depth, it initiates the perception of color, and it allows us to distinguish shape and form. For a scene to be successful in computer graphics (CG), these realities of light need to be reproduced as faithfully as possible. The trick is learning to see light and its astonishing effects on the world around us.

Learning Outcomes: In this chapter, you will be able to

  • ■■  Understand basic concepts for setting up CG lighting
  • ■■  Choose the appropriate Autodesk® Maya® light for a scene based on light attributes
  • ■■  Control which lights illuminate certain objects through light linking
  • ■■  Create mood and realism with raytraced shadows
  • ■■  Illuminate and render a scene with mental ray® Physical Sun and Sky
  • ■■  Produce special lighting effects with volumetric lighting, lens flare, and shader glow
  • ■■  Practice setting up a basic lighting solution for the toy airplane, glass candle holder, and decorative box
  • ■■  Use raytracing to cast shadows in your scene and use refractions to create a glass look
  • ■■  Animate the attributes of a light and aim lights with the special manipulator

Audio Video Production 4/15-4/18

  1. Lesson 10: The Multitrack Mixer View

    There are two different interfaces for the Multitrack Editor. The one we’ve covered so far resembles the editor in a video program, whereas the Mixer view emulates the “look and feel” of a traditional hardware mixer as used in audio productions for well over half a century. The major difference, aside from the look, is that the Mixer view does not allow for working with clips. However, you can see more multitrack project parameters at once, which is often convenient for mixing.

    Although some students might feel more comfortable with one option or the other initially, encourage them to get used to switching to whichever view is “the right tool for the right job.” When doing recording and arrangement with a multitrack project, the regular Multitrack Editor is usually the preferred interface. But when all tracks are recorded and the arrangement is complete, the project will transition to mixing, and the Mixer view is usually the best choice for that function.

    Goals for this lesson

    In this lesson, students will learn how to do the following:

    • Switch from the Multitrack Editor to the Mixer view
    • Adjust the Mixer fader heights to allow for greater resolution when setting levels
    • Show/hide various areas to customize the Mixer size and configuration
    • Scroll through different Effects Rack inserts and sends within their respective areas
    • Scroll to view different groups of channels if the Mixer window isn’t wide enough to show them all
    • Differentiate among channel types via color coding
    • Rearrange the Mixer channel order

Video Game Design 4/14-4/18

 Lesson: 8.11 When Do I Use an Object?

Section:


In this lesson students are introduced to sets as a way to store an unordered list of items.


In this lesson students are introduced to a grid as a way to store data in a table-like format.



In this lesson students get to explore more with grids.

Computer Science 4/15-4/18


Students will be able to:

  • Use mathematical operators with strings

Objective

In this lesson, students will be able to perform string operations in order to concatenate values together.


In this lesson, students revisit the concept of comments. Comments are helpful because they allow programmers to leave notes about the program they are writing.

Objective

Students will be able to:

  • Incorporate comments into their programs in order to make them more readable

In this lesson, students review content with a 20 question Unit Quiz.

Objective

Students will be able to:

  • Prove their knowledge of basic coding concepts through a multiple choice quiz

Notebooks due on Thursday 4/18

Animation 4/8-4/12

Chapter 10

Autodesk® Maya® Lighting

Light shapes the world by showing us what we see. It creates a sense of depth, it initiates the perception of color, and it allows us to distinguish shape and form. For a scene to be successful in computer graphics (CG), these realities of light need to be reproduced as faithfully as possible. The trick is learning to see light and its astonishing effects on the world around us.

Learning Outcomes: In this chapter, you will be able to

  • ■■  Understand basic concepts for setting up CG lighting
  • ■■  Choose the appropriate Autodesk® Maya® light for a scene based on light attributes
  • ■■  Control which lights illuminate certain objects through light linking
  • ■■  Create mood and realism with raytraced shadows
  • ■■  Illuminate and render a scene with mental ray® Physical Sun and Sky
  • ■■  Produce special lighting effects with volumetric lighting, lens flare, and shader glow
  • ■■  Practice setting up a basic lighting solution for the toy airplane, glass candle holder, and decorative box
  • ■■  Use raytracing to cast shadows in your scene and use refractions to create a glass look
  • ■■  Animate the attributes of a light and aim lights with the special manipulator

Audio Video Production 4/8-4/12

Lesson 9: Multitrack Editor Orientation

Lesson 9 is the first lesson devoted exclusively to the Multitrack Editor. Lessons 10–16 build on the material presented in this lesson, so it’s important that students fully understand the topics presented here before proceeding.

Goals for this lesson

In this lesson, students will learn how to do the following:

  • Integrate the Waveform and Multitrack Editors so you can switch back and forth between the two
  • Show how track colorization makes it easier to identify tracks quickly
  • Play back a specific part of music repeatedly (looped playback)
  • Edit track level and position in the stereo field
  • Apply EQ, effect, and sends areas in tracks
  • Apply EQ to tracks using the Multitrack Editor’s built-in parametric EQ
  • Apply effects to individual tracks
  • Process multiple tracks with a single effect to save CPU power and produce more consistent results
  • Map effects channels so that outputs can feed different audio channels than the default settings
  • Set up side-chain effects so that one track can control the effect in another track